Your Way to Creative Writing Success

Writing Success

by Annette Young

When you first start creative writing, it can seem like a mammoth journey to take before you feel comfortable with your writing and can start to believe in your own abilities. It also takes a while to find your ‘voice’ and style. Part of your creative journey is to find out your writing strengths and to build the foundations of your skillset but you need to also accept any weaknesses that may be present currently and to spend time working on those areas which you may not enjoy quite so much. As with anything in life, sometimes we veer away from those tasks or elements which are not quite so appealing.

Let others see your work. This can be scary if you are not confident but it’s part of your progression. There’s a sense of joy and accomplishment when others read and enjoy your work and then you can progress to the next stage of your development by having a professional critique. This will enable you to understand any work that is required before you even think about publication.

It’s also a good idea to meet other writers. Join a writing group if you can or, team up with a like-minded individual and work on some writing projects together. This can help take the isolating factors away from writing. There is always something to learn in creative writing and this is good because it means you will not get bored but continuously strive forward learning new techniques until you can think and feel like a writer.

Never be scared to try out new writing techniques. You may naturally be drawn to one element of writing but in fact, your natural talent lies in another area. When teaching at college level, I found many of my students had fabulous writing skills but they had never even tried those aspects of writing before. When you try out new techniques, you increase your ability to write but you also expand your mind. Most of all, have fun with your writing. Set yourself mini-goals, write to deadlines, enter writing challenges, have a writing party where you have friends and families attending creative sessions.

The more time you can spend creatively, the more instinctive your writing will become. 

Do you need help with your writing? Try our Fiction Masterclass, Novel Writing Blueprint or, any of our Creative Writing Courses.

The Writing Life

 

Life as a writer

by Annette Young

Someone asked me the other day why I write. It’s not a simple answer, it’s complex because it is such an integral part of me. When I tried to explain that I couldn’t halt the sway of characters or ideas that popped into my mind, that I lived and breathed my role as a writer because not only was it my career but I truly loved it and needed it, I could see them mentally calculating my sanity, or, at the very least, wondering how I was able to function in the real world.

But this is both the joy and the plight of the writer.

We are firmly contained within our own thought processes and life outside of our creative imaginings is often not as vibrantly rich or as fulfilling. I’m often guilty of switching off and slipping into my own make-believe zone as a potential whopper of an idea comes to mind. I often return to the present wide-eyed, wondering what I have missed. 

Not everyone can understand what it means to be a writer. Certainly, some people may not be supportive of your creative drive. This is because it is an alien occupation to many. It’s isolating and, time-consuming. You need to slip into the story-line, see it and feel it and become a watcher on the side lines of your own story. For family and friends, your writing passion may be just an annoyance, it takes you away from the family unit, it means you don’t listen to them or notice when those little jobs need doing. Often there’s a disbelief that it is possible to support yourself or to make a living through the written word. But whether you are as yet unpublished or, have started to carve out your niche as a writer, it’s more about the enjoyment of writing and of being able to satisfy those creative urges.

I think this….write because you need to, write because it feels good and write because you cannot imagine ever doing anything else. 



Inspirational Creative Writing Tips

Tips for writers

Author Annette Young

By Annette Young

If you are considering a new fictional project, stop for a moment and scan through these creative writing tips first as they just might help you to increase your connection to the reader before you’ve even written one word. It pays to really consider what you are trying to achieve before you start out, spontaneous bursts of creative writing might feel wonderful but if you want the outcome to have a more professional edge, then a little contemplation can make all the difference.

These creative writing tips may seem commonsensical but put them together and consider them throughout and your fiction will be creatively stronger as a result.

1. Creating a dramatic opening is essential if you want to hook the reader but it doesn’t always have to be an action scene, instead why not consider starting with tension? The opening could be a life-threatening revelation and the reader is instantly aware that the clock is ticking and the character may or may not make it. Tension is interwoven in our lives, we all fight against it but when we use it in reality, (like using a deadline for increased inspiration) it can serve to give the story a sense of realism.

2. If you are going to start with a sense of drama, it’s good to end each chapter with a hook. This will keep the reader turning the pages as they will be desperate to see what happens next. If you are writing a short work of fiction, you can still build tension towards the climax and make it a memorable ending.

3. Don’t reveal everything to the reader. When you settle down to read a book, you don’t want to know everything at the start. You want the opening pages to be attention-grabbing and to pull you into the story, but if the writer gives it all away or makes it so predictable, why read more? Tease the reader with some carefully chosen snippets of information that will have them mulling over this news and they will become absorbed, anticipating the outcomes. Keep it fresh but believable.

4. When you craft your characters, do you know what they really want or need to achieve? If you don’t, you will just have them treading fictional water. There’s a huge difference between characters that have an aim, and those who just mill around. Think about the people you know in real life. Those who have a cause and who are determined to achieve will stand out, they may  not always be likeable in some aspects but they are memorable. Your characters  need to incite interest in some way or another. Don’t make it too easy for your characters to achieve either, throw in a few obstacles to make it interesting.

5. No characters are the same throughout. We all have layers that make up our personalities. Some people sulk when they don’t get their own way, others work harder to achieve, some people attract the wrong personality types, others create incredible friendships. Past actions and learned behaviours can make your characters act in very different ways  than might be expected. People are not always logical or in control of their emotions, but their actions are usually as a result of something.How well do you know your characters?

Find a good starting point and let the words flow with a flourish. If you have conviction in  your writing and your story, your technique will improve dramatically and so will the end result. These creative writing tips are useful but only valuable if you use them each and every time. Eventually, these tips will become instinctive and you will develop an intuitive approach to storytelling.

 

 

 

Creative Writing – How To Use The Power Of Your Imagination

By Grace Jolliffe

Do you feel you sometimes lack imagination? Or that your imagination is low or tired? Well, it’s simply not true – everybody has lots of imagination. If you disagree with this statement try not to build a picture in your mind of a pink elephant wearing a white hat and cool shades. Next, try not to see the pink elephant with the white hat and cool shades dancing… get the picture?

Now, try this exercise: Think back to your earliest childhood memory. Was the sun shining? Were you in your pram? In the garden? Were there butterflies?

Keep asking yourself questions and fix on your most vivid memory. You will probably find you have added a few extras to the memory. Now, write it down – all of it – every detail you can think of. The first time I did this exercise I saw myself as a baby peeping out of a pram and looking at a beautiful garden, filled with butterflies and of course the sun was shining.

Is this memory or is this imagination? If you have just seen the above images as I described then you know the answer already. You may have added the above butterflies. That is okay, memory is a great tool for a writer but it is not everything.

The power of suggestion is immense. If, for example, I mention a white Unicorn or a large fire-breathing dragon you will immediately see these in your mind. Your imagination will deliver the images you think about.

HOW TO USE THE POWER OF YOUR IMAGINATION TO CREATE A STORY

You can trigger your imagination in a myriad of ways. One of the most powerful ways is by asking yourself questions.

Taking the above example a few steps further:

A white wolf has come down from the mountains and is approaching the garden. It is now frighteningly close to you as a baby. Somebody comes to the rescue.

Ask yourself why the wolf came down from the mountains. Why it approached you as a baby and who came to the rescue.

Now you have the beginnings of a story, and you can use your imagination to bring this story further, by asking more questions.

You can take ‘you’ out of the story and replace with a fictional character. If you don’t know who your new character is you can simply let your story create a character by simply inserting ‘man’ or ‘woman’ and asking yourself questions about them to generate a character.

To exercise your imagination, simply use it. For example, you are in walking in a park. Who is there? What are they doing? Who or what is lurking under the bushes? Who is hovering below the still waters of a nearby lake?

Your imagination is always present. All you have to do is use it by asking yourself questions. Don’t forget though – write everything down.

For more lots more creative writing help, tips and exercises visit http://www.practicalcreativewriting.com

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